1. Aug 17,2014

  2. escapekit:

    DareDevils of New York

    Despite risking death, a number of daring Instagrammers are fervently posting photos of themselves casually perched on the rooftops of high-rise buildings and bridges—just to be recognized within the growing community of like-minded users. 

  3. thekhooll:

    Katherine Baxter

    "Katherine Baxter’s work is exquisite, whether small or large scale. Meticulous research goes into every ‘jewel’ like piece, and the pleasure she derives from producing these, is communicated to us all. There is complete mastery of the axonometric projection, as can be appreciated in her grand London and New York posters. It is, as if one is transported by hot air balloon, floating gently over all those much loved and beautifully painted landmarks.” David Driver Head of design, The Times

    (Source: archatlas)

  4. escapekit:

    Aerial Landscapes of Iceland 

    While on a recent trip to Iceland, photographer Sarah Martinet had the opportunity to shoot these amazing landscapes from a plane with open windows.

  5. softmami:

    Fujimidai Tokyo by SNARK

  6. elenamorelli:

    { midsummer starry nights }

  7. quoteskine:

Same

    quoteskine:

    Same

  8. fastcompany:

The Annotated Guide To Banana Republic’s “Startup Guy” Look
Banana Republic, for its fall fashion line, has put together a “Startup Guy” look, which reads more “Brooklyn Guy on the L train” than hoodie-wearing tech dork. But no matter: Fashion is aspirational. “The Startup Guy” outfit isn’t what dudes working in tech today actually wear, it is what they may want to look like after they see BR’s latest catalog.
But what exactly makes this man in khakis and a blue button-down—pretty standard fare for business casual—the prototypical “startup guy”? Fast Company tried discern what about this getup Banana Republic thinks screams “startup guy.” 
Read More>

i need to dress like this more often.

    fastcompany:

    The Annotated Guide To Banana Republic’s “Startup Guy” Look

    Banana Republic, for its fall fashion line, has put together a “Startup Guy” look, which reads more “Brooklyn Guy on the L train” than hoodie-wearing tech dork. But no matter: Fashion is aspirational. “The Startup Guy” outfit isn’t what dudes working in tech today actually wear, it is what they may want to look like after they see BR’s latest catalog.

    But what exactly makes this man in khakis and a blue button-down—pretty standard fare for business casual—the prototypical “startup guy”? Fast Company tried discern what about this getup Banana Republic thinks screams “startup guy.” 

    Read More>

    i need to dress like this more often.

  9. fastcompany:

    theenergyissue:

    The Dumpster Project: Creating One of the Most Sustainable Tiny Homes

    Jeff Wilson, an environmental professor at Huston-Tillotson University in Austin, Texas, has been living in a dumpster on campus for the past four months. The 33-sq-ft space, only 1% the size of the average American home, is in the first phase of a project to test the possibilities of sustainable and “tiny” living. Currently outfitted to match the poor energy performance of a typical American house, it will soon be retrofitted with all sustainable features, including solar panels and a “cutting-edge eco toilet.” The project is currently seeking additional funding through Kickstarter

    The oddity of the dumpster house has drawn in an audience that otherwise probably would not be talking about sustainable design. He was featured on a recent episode of a conservative radio show, for instance. Though the hosts opened the show by framing Wilson as “a hipster who’s had too many PBRs,” they ended up expressing support for the project.

    “How many times do you get a conservative talk show saying they love a project that has undercurrents of sustainability?” Wilson asks. “They wouldn’t have even called me if I wasn’t living in a dumpster.” Read More>